“El Sol” July 2019

By 1 July, 2019 El Sol de Nerja

Five curiosities about Mediterranean Sea

Nerja faces the Mediterranean SeaEvery year millions of tourists visit the shores of the Mediterranean Sea, known

for their magnificent beaches spread over twenty countries like in Nerja.

The biological diversity in its waters of pleasant temperatures is one of the points for which this sea has passed throughout history such as the Egyptians, Phoenicians, Greeks, Carthaginians or Romans.

In this post we are going to share some of the secrets of this sea that bathes, among many others, our precious Pitiusas, Ibiza and Formentera.

The Mediterranean Sea washes 20 countries and 3 continents

The Mediterranean Sea it’s surrounded by twenty countries belonging to the continents of Europe, Africa and Asia. Some of them are Italy, Spain, France, Greece, Turkey, Lebanon, Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria or Morocco.

Some 100 million visitors make the Mediterranean coast one of the world’s leading tourist hotspots.

Represents 1% of the surface of the oceans

The Mediterranean Sea has an area of 2.51 million square kilometres.

Still, it accounts for a negligible 1% of the total area of the oceans almost 46,000 kilometres of coastline.

Its maximum depth exceeds 5,000 meters

The average depth of the Mediterranean is 1,430 meters, however, in the matapán pit, near Greece, the deepest sea level reaches more than 5,000 meters, namely 5,267. Far away in any case from the greater depth of the documented ocean, near the island of Guam, in the north of the Philippines, in the famous Mariana trench, with a depth of 11,033 meters.

Nerja Mediterranean SeaIn Ancient Rome was called Mare Nostrum

Mare Nostrum was the name given to the Mediterranean Sea by the Romans in their imperial era, which meant “our sea” in Latin. The etymology that has transcended to our day also comes from the Latin “Mar Medi Terraneum”, whose meaning is “sea in the middle of the lands”.

The Strait of Gibraltar: only source of renewal

The Mediterranean connects with the Atlantic Ocean, which is its only source of water renewal and replenishment. It does so only through the Strait of Gibraltar, which separates Europe and Africa and at its narrowest point is 14.4 kilometres. Therefore, it could be said that the Mediterranean basin is “almost” closed.

Download the full newspaper from the link >> El Sol July 2019

 

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